Tag Archives: medicina d’urgenza

Only Evidenced Based Medicine? Evidently……not!

4 Feb
man-jumping_logoThe modern emergency medicine based most of his clinical practice on evidence-based trials. 
But really all that is not coming from randomized controlled trials does not exist?

The paradox of the demonstration of the effectiveness of the parachute with randomized controlled trials, in accordance with the method EBM (The Parachute trial), provocatively poses a fundamental question:

If the scientific basis of any therapeutic intervention are already strong, and the benefit for the population is large, is ethically correct to wait large-scale trial to implement it, delaying its potential benefits?

A 2006 article published in the BMJ Controversy Parachute approach to evidence based medicine brilliantly responded to this question.

It contains some examples of very common diseases in developing countries (HIV, dehydration in children, postpartum hemorrhage) whose remedies, implemented previously than results of relative trials where available, have saved thousands of lives.

The authors conclude that:

1. Randomised controlled trials are usually required before new interventions are implemented

2. If other evidence of effectiveness is good, and potential benefits large, the resultant delays may be unethical

3. Examples from poor countries show the price of delaying interventions

The triad of decision-making at the base of the construction of Evidenced Based Medicine provides an integrated approach between explicit data (scientific evidence derived from trials of good quality) and tacit data(clinical expertise and the patient’s needs).

MedInfo_EBMtriadImage

The clinical decision is derived from the combination of these three factors:
• Scientific evidence
• Clinical Experience

• Needs of the patient

But when defining the level of quality of evidence those derived from clinical practice and experience are relegated to the base (lower level) of the pyramid whose apex (higher degree) are the evidence derived from studies on large patient populations.

ebp_pyramid

Randomisation and de-personalization of scientific research, while eliminates everything that is “non-evident” in medical research, and is well suited to a concept of public health, on the other hand maintains an unbridgeable gap with daily clinical practice that is focused on the care of the individuals.

But in practice what we can do:

  • Integration of explicit data, result of the evidence, with the “tacit knowing” that is generated only from the direct doctor-patient relationship is desirable.
  • The “tacit knowing” is the basis of our medical education, such as learning the language is to pre-school children: it does not need structured teaching but it is learned from direct experience.
  • The “tacit-knowing”, often reduced to subjective data and therefore of lesser dignity, is in fact, just because “innate”, less prone to the common bias of explicit data;
  • We must recognize equal dignity to both those data “explicits” and “tacits.”
  • We must take into account both explicit and tacit elements in the formulation of the hypothesis and the resulting diagnostic therapeutic strategy.

We can and we must go beyond the exclusive use of EBM in medical research and clinical practice.

The adoption of an integrated approach between the explicit scientific evidence derived from clinical trials (EBM) and a “patient- centered approach” derived from the clinical experience, should be a stimulus and an intent to the future development of our approach to the critically ill patient.

It must always be clear in the mind of the emergency medicine professionals which treatment is scientifically more correct for a given disease, but he must contextualise, and implement it for the particular patient who is dealing with at that time

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Italian transcript

References:

“Humans Are Not Yeast”: (almost) everything we believe about lactate is a myth. 

5 Ott

4e193a6c-13de-44f2-aabe-2b095321f652_1-8a517f942153f96606ebbde8331f1dc8On September issue of Emergency Medicine News, Paul Marik wrote an article entitled “Humans are not yeast”

This is a game changer article about the current concepts on lactic acid and its clinical meaning in emergency medicine.

The author illustrate simple but well established concepts about lactic acid metabolism that revert most of the common conceptions about its significance in clincal medicine.  

I will resume below some of the most relevant concepts expressed in the article. The italic bullet point text is from the original article.

I really encourage all of you to read the full text of original article to completely understand the whole rationale behind those statements and to access the complete list of references.

It is free open access.

Let’s start with some biochemistry.  

Piruvate, the product of glycolysis, can enter in Krebs cicle to produce energy through aerobic (oxygen driven) process or can take a shorter and faster (x100 times) way to produce energy when is transformed to lactate (the basis of lactic acid) using NADH (so reduced to NAD+ and ready to take another H+) and H+.

  • No hydrogen ions are present in glycolysis. In fact, the conversion of pyruvate to lactate consumes hydrogen ions. It is actually a lactic alkalosis. (J Mol Cell Cardiol 1997;9[11]:867.)
  • Increased lactate may simply occur because of increased production of pyruvate due to in- creased glycolysis there is no oxygen debt. We spoke about the muscles exporting lactate; the same thing happens in shock: lactate is used as a fuel for oxidative metabolism. Lactate is transported into the mitochondrion through specific transport proteins, and then is converted to pyruvate in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Pyruvate then moves into the mitochondrial matrix and undergoes oxidative metabolism.
    Lactate is, therefore, a fuel for oxidative metabolism. It’s consumed by the brain and heart, and that is absolutely vital to survival when someone is in shock
    .
So why is lactate produced and used for?
Lactate is aerobically producted by muscle and is a more efficient source of energy for the brain and the heart.
  • Lactate is a much more efficient bioenergetic fuel than glucose so as someone exercises, the muscles make lactate to fuel the heart. The heart works much more efficiently with lactate. What happens to the brain? The exact same thing. As someone exercises, brain lactate goes up, and the brain starts using lactate preferentially as a source of fuel. This is a brilliant design: Muscles make lactate aerobically as a source of energy for the brain and heart.
Lactic metabolic acidosis is a biochemical myth! It’s more a lactic alkalosis.
  • The lactic acidosis explanation of metabolic acidosis is not supported by fundamental biochemistry, and has no research basis. Acidosis is caused by reactions other than lactate production.  
  • No hydrogen ions are present in glycolysis. In fact, the conversion of pyruvate to lactate consumes hydrogen ions. It is actually a lactic alkalosis. (J Mol Cell Cardiol 1997;9[11]:867.)
Hypoxia does not induce lactate serum level elevation, and in sepsis oxygen cellular level is not decreased. 
  • There is this pervasive idea that people with sepsis have cellular hypoxia and bioenergetic failure, but this concept was debunked in 1992. Compared with limited infection, the muscle O2 goes up in patients with severe sepsis.
  • Increased lactate may simply occur because of increased production of pyruvate due to increased glycolysis there is no oxygen debt. We spoke about the muscles exporting lactate; the same thing happens in shock: lactate is used as a fuel for oxidative metabolism. Lactate is, therefore, a fuel for oxidative metabolism. It’s consumed by the brain and heart, and that is absolutely vital to survival when someone is in shock. The body makes lactate, which is then used as a metabolic fuel.
Iperlactic state is generated, by epinephrine and not by hypoxia, in case of extreme physiological stress as protective mechanism.
  • The clinical plausibility was that lactate increases during adrenergic states and in the absence of an oxygen debt. Lactate increases with epinephrine infusion; lactate increases with hyperdynamic sepsis. All of the states have a high cardiac output, high oxygen delivery, and not a single trace of hypoxia. It’s driven by epinephrine, not by hypoxia.
  • We do know that lactate is associated with increased mortality because the sicker a patient is, the higher his epinephrine levels. It’s a protective mechanism. The association is related to the fact that lactate is a biomarker of physiological stress. And clearly the greater the physiological stress, the greater the risk of death. But lactate itself is a survival advantage, and it’s not an evolutionary accident that we make lactate.

Credits:

Thanks to the author and to Aidan Baron who originally shared the article.

Reference:

  1. The Science of Emergency Medicine: Humans Are Not Yeast. Emergency Medicine News: September 2016 – Volume 38 – Issue 9 – pp 1,29–30 doi:10.1097/01.EEM.0000499522.28133.48

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“Best Practice” preospedaliera: Arresto cardiaco da trauma

4 Ago

Tra tutte le “Best Practices”, quella che rappresenta più di tutte un cambio radicale di mentalità nell’approccio clinico e terapeutico, è la gestione dell’arresto cardiaco da causa traumatica. Vi prego quindi di leggere attentamente le raccomandzioni raccolte nel documento sottostante e di non esitare a esprimere le vostre riflessioni nei commenti.

Arresto cardiaco adulto traumatico

Chi è interessato ad approfondire il razionale che sta alla base  delle raccomandazioni può scaricare e leggere il documento completo: Arresto cardiaco nell’adulto da causa traumatica full text

 

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“Best Practice” preospedaliera: Arresto cardiaco nel neonato

29 Lug

Continua la pubblicazione di una serie di monografie dedicate alle Best Practices per l’emergenza preospedaliera.

La quarta della serie riguarda l’arresto cardiaco nel neonato.

Potete scaricare il documento cliccando sull’icona sottostante.

Arresto cardiaco neonato

 

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“Best Practice” preospedaliera: Arresto cardiaco in età pediatrica

16 Lug

Continua la pubblicazione di una serie di monografie dedicate alle Best Practices per l’emergenza preospedaliera.

La terza della serie riguarda l’arresto cardiaco in età pediatrica.

Potete scaricare il documento cliccando sull’icona sottostante.Arresto cardiaco pediatrico

 

 

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“Best Practice” preospedaliera: Arresto cardiaco in gravidanza

1 Lug

Continua la pubblicazione di una serie di monografie dedicate alle Best Practices per l’emergenza preospedaliera.

La seconda della serie riguarda l’arresto cardiaco in gravidanza.

Potete scaricare il documento cliccando sull’icona sottostante.

Arresto cardiaco gravidanza_Page_1

 

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“Best Practice” preospedaliera

25 Giu

Da oggi inizia la pubblicazione di una serie di monografie dedicate alle Best Practices per l’emergenza preospedaliera.

La prima riguarda l’arresto cardiaco nel paziente adulto da causa non traumatica.

Potete scaricare il documento cliccando sull’icona sottostante.

Arresto cardiaco adulto non traumatico_Page_1

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2016 NICE Major Trauma Guidelines. The pre-hospital recommendations.

21 Feb

NICE released the 2016 Major trauma Guidelines.

Many interesting recommendations where made for pre-hospital and in hospital providers about several topics

  • Airway management

  • Chest trauma

  • Haemorrage control

  • Circulatory access

  • Volume resuscitation

  • Fluid replacement

  • Pain management

  • Documentation

  • Training

Here is the Excerpt regarding the pre-hospital settings

Download the full guidelines for in-hospital recommendations and full description of Guidelines process and rationale behind every single recommendation

Download the full Guidelines at:

Major trauma: assessment and initial management

NICE guidelines [NG39] Published date: February 2016

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Forget ACLS guidelines if you are dealing with Pulseless Electric Activity. Part 1.

5 Set
ACLS Guidelines are misleading about diagnosis and treatment of pulseless electric activity (PEA)
This takes to conceptual and clinical errors when treating patients in cardiac arrest.
Let’s see why and if there is a better way to follow when dealing with this kind of patients.
First part is about diagnosis and diagnostic tools.

Live your comment below and see you soon for Part 2. The treatment options.

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My favourite VL view to increase first pass intubation

8 Feb

A debate is ongoing among #FOAMED social media about increasing first passage rate in tracheal intubation and some difficulties when using VL.

At the beginning of my experience with VL I experienced some difficulties, but with a radical change in technical approach I reached a good security on first pass success.

Here are my consideration and I hope will be useful for anyone is starting using VL

 

There are some fundamental differences in VL technique respect to DL, that makes the DL more easy and intuitive to pass the tube trough the cords.

3axys

The 3 axys theory for airway management

“Sniffing position” align the pharyngeal axis with the laryngeal one

Sniffing position

Sniffing position

Perfoming Direct Laryngoscopy with the laryngoscope we align the mouth axis to have a direct view of the cords.

DL view

DL VIEW

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This view coincide with the route for passing the tube, making this step intuitive and easy.

 

When using a Video Laryngoscope we take our eyes right in front of the larynx, having a perfect “video” view of the vocal cords, but also minimally modifying the axis of the mouth.

Visione in videolaringoscopia

VL VIEW

This difference makes the act of passing the tube not so easy and not so intuitive, cause of the contrast between the perfect video laryngeal view and the not easy passage of the tube trough the cords.

In those cases the stylet, the Bougie/Froban or the external glottic maneuvers, are useful to facilitate the video-intubation.

tubo stylet

Golf stick shape of the tube+stylet

But the first goal is to reach this view on the screen of the videolaryngoscope.

IMG_1278

I want to have the epiglottis right at the center of the screen and this comes prior of a good view of the larynx.

Epiglottoscopy is the key point of my management of the airways in general and when prforming VL in particular.

Having the epiglottis in central position on the screen allow to:

  • lower the glottic plane facilitating intubation
  • decrease  the force to apply on the airways minimizing traumatism and neck movement in case of trauma.
  • fits all the difficult airway situations because a poor view of the cords is what you are looking for!

If you agree, memorize my favorite view and reach for it when using a video device to mange the airways.

All comments are welcome so please let me know your thoughts.

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