Highlights from 2014 AHA/ACC/HRS Guideline for the Management of Patients With Atrial Fibrillation

24 apr

2014 AHA/ACC/HRS Guideline for the Management of Patients With Atrial Fibrillation

Sono state pubblicate le linee guida 2014 sul trattamento dei pazienti con Fibrillazione Atriale.

Ecco i punti  d’interesse per la medicina d’urgenza.

Per approfondire scaricate il full text nella sezione Linee Guida

Definitions:

  • “Paroxysmal AF”    “AF that terminates spontaneously or with intervention within 7 d of onset. Episodes may recur with variable frequency.”
  • “Persistent AF”    “Continuous AF that is sustained >7 d.”
  • “Longstanding persistent AF”    “Continuous AF of >12 mo duration.”
  • “Permanent AF”    “Permanent AF is used when there has been a joint decision by the patient and clinician to cease further attempts to restore and/or maintain sinus rhythm.
  • “Nonvalvular AF”    “AF in the absence of rheumatic mitral stenosis, a mechanical or bioprosthetic heart valve, or mitral valve repair.”
  • “Lone AF” is a historical descriptor that has been variably applied to younger individuals without clinical or echocardiographic evidence of cardiopulmonary disease, hypertension, or diabetes mellitus (4-7).
    Because definitions are variable, the term “lone AF’” is potentially confusing and should not be used to guide
    therapeutic decisions.
Types of AF

AF Types

Clinical Evaluation: Recommendation

Class I
  • Electrocardiographic documentation is recommended to establish the diagnosis of AF. (Level of Evidence: C)

Rate control in AF

Class I
  • Control of the ventricular rate using a beta blocker or nondihydropyridine calcium channel antagonist is recommended for patients with paroxysmal, persistent, or permanent AF (260-262). (Level of Evidence: B)
  • Intravenous administration of a beta blocker or nondihydropyridine calcium channel blocker is  recommended to slow the ventricular heart rate in the acute setting in patients without pre-excitation. In hemodynamically unstable patients, electrical cardioversion is indicated. (Level of Evidence: B)
  • In patients who experience AF-related symptoms during activity, the adequacy of heart rate control should be assessed during exertion, adjusting pharmacological treatment as necessary to keep the ventricular rate within the physiological range. (Level of Evidence: C)
Class IIa
  • A heart rate control (resting heart rate <80 bpm) strategy is reasonable for symptomatic management of AF. (Level of Evidence: B)
  • Intravenous amiodarone can be useful for rate control in critically ill patients without preexcitation. (Level of Evidence: B)
Class IIb
  • A lenient rate-control strategy (resting heart rate <110 bpm) may be reasonable as long as patients remain asymptomatic and LV systolic function is preserved. (Level of Evidence: B)
  • Oral amiodarone may be useful for ventricular rate control when other measures are unsuccessful or contraindicated. (Level of Evidence: C)
Class III: Harm
  • Nondihydropyridine calcium channel antagonists should not be used in patients with decompensated HF as these may lead to further hemodynamic compromise. (Level of Evidence: C)
  • In patients with pre-excitation and AF, digoxin, nondihydropyridine calcium channel antagonists, or intravenous amiodarone should not be administered as they may increase the ventricular response and may result in ventricular fibrillation (274). (Level of Evidence: B)

Drugs

Beta blockers
  • Metoprolol tartrate 2.5–5.0 mg IV bolus over 2 min; up to 3 doses 25–100 mg BID
  • Atenolol  25–100 mg QD
  • Esmolol 500 mcg/kg IV bolus over 1 min, then 50–300 mcg/kg/min IV
  • Propranolol 1 mg IV over 1 min, up to 3 doses at 2 min intervals 10–40 mg TID or QID
  • Nadolol 10–240 mg QD
  • Carvedilol 3.125–25 mg BID
  • Bisoprolol 2.5–10 mg QD
Nondihydropyridine calcium channel antagonists
  • Verapamil (0.075-0.15 mg/kg) IV bolus over 2 min, may give an additional 10.0 mg after 30 min if no response, then 0.005 mg/kg/min infusion 180–480 mg QD (ER)
  • Diltiazem 0.25 mg/kg IV bolus over 2 min, then 5-15 mg/h 120–360 mg QD (ER)
Digitalis glycosides
  • Digoxin 0.25 mg IV with repeat dosing to a maximum of 1.5 mg over 24 h 0.125–0.25 mg QD
Others
  • Amiodarone 300 mg IV over 1 h, then 10–50 mg/h over 24 h 100–200 mg QD

AF indicates atrial fibrillation; BID, twice daily; ER, extended release; IV, intravenous; N/A, not applicable; QD, once
daily; QID, four times a day; and TID, three times a day

Rate-control-strategy-in-AF

Approach to Selecting Drug Therapy for Ventricular Rate Control

Rhythm Control

Electrical and Pharmacological Cardioversion of AF and Atrial Flutter

Thromboembolism Prevention: Recommendations
Class I
  • For patients with AF or atrial flutter of 48-hour duration or longer, or when the duration of AF is unknown, anticoagulation with warfarin (INR 2.0 to 3.0) is recommended for at least 3 weeks prior to and 4 weeks after cardioversion, regardless of the CHA2DS2-VASc score and the method (electrical or pharmacological) used to restore sinus rhythm (313-316). (Level of Evidence: B)
  • For patients with AF or atrial flutter of more than 48 hours or unknown duration that requires immediate cardioversion for hemodynamic instability, anticoagulation should be initiated as soon as possible and continued for at least 4 weeks after cardioversion unless contraindicated. (Level of Evidence: C)
  • For patients with AF or atrial flutter of less than 48-hour duration and with high risk of stroke, intravenous heparin or LMWH, or administration of a factor Xa or direct thrombin inhibitor, is recommended as soon as possible before or immediately after cardioversion, followed by longterm anticoagulation therapy. (Level of Evidence: C)
  • Following cardioversion for AF of any duration, the decision regarding long-term anticoagulation therapy should be based on the thromboembolic risk profile (Section 4). (Level of Evidence: C)
Direct-Current Cardioversion:

A number of technical factors influence cardioversion efficacy, including energy, waveform, and electrode placement. A biphasic waveform is more effective than a monophasic waveform. Anteroposterior electrode placement is superior to anterolateral placement in some but not all studies. If an attempt at cardioversion using 1 electrode placement fails, another attempt using the alternative placement is recommended. The initial use of a higher-energy shock is more effective and may minimize the number of
shocks required as well as the duration of sedation. The risks associated with cardioversion include thromboembolism, sedation-related complications, ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation, bradyarrhythmias, skin burn or irritation from electrodes, muscle soreness, and reprogramming or altering implanted cardiac device function. Elective cardioversion should not be performed in patients with evidence of digoxin toxicity, severe hypokalemia, or other electrolyte imbalances until these factors are corrected.

Recommendations
Class I
  • In pursuing a rhythm-control strategy, cardioversion is recommended for patients with AF or atrial flutter as a method to restore sinus rhythm. If cardioversion is unsuccessful, repeated direct-current cardioversion attempts may be made after adjusting the location of the electrodes or applying pressure over the electrodes, or following administration of an antiarrhythmic medication (320). (Level of Evidence: B)
  • Cardioversion is recommended when a rapid ventricular response to AF or atrial flutter does not respond promptly to pharmacological therapies and contributes to ongoing myocardial ischemia, hypotension, or HF. (Level of Evidence: C)
  • Cardioversion is recommended for patients with AF or atrial flutter and pre-excitation when tachycardia is associated with hemodynamic instability. (Level of Evidence: C)
Pharmacological Cardioversion: Recommendations
Class I
  • Flecainide, dofetilide, propafenone, and intravenous ibutilide are useful for pharmacological cardioversion of AF or atrial flutter provided contraindications to the selected drug are absent. (Level of Evidence: A)
Class IIa

 

  • Administration of oral amiodarone is a reasonable option for pharmacological cardioversion of AF. (Level of Evidence: A)
  • Propafenone or flecainide (“pill-in-the-pocket”) in addition to a beta blocker or nondihydropyridine calcium channel antagonist is reasonable to terminate AF outside the hospital once this treatment has been observed to be safe in a monitored setting for selected patients.(Level of Evidence: B)
Class III: Harm
  • Dofetilide therapy should not be initiated out of hospital owing to the risk of excessive QT prolongation that can cause torsades de pointes. (Level of Evidence: B)
Strategies for Rhythm Control in Patients with Paroxysmal and Persistent AF
Strategies for Rhythm Control in Patients with Paroxysmal and Persistent AF

AF Complicating ACS: Recommendations

Class I
  • Urgent direct-current cardioversion of new-onset AF in the setting of ACS is recommended for patients with hemodynamic compromise, ongoing ischemia, or inadequate rate control. (Level of Evidence: C)
  • Intravenous beta blockers are recommended to slow a rapid ventricular response to AF in patients with ACS who do not display HF, hemodynamic instability, or bronchospasm. (Level of Evidence: C)
Class IIb
  • Administration of amiodarone or digoxin may be considered to slow a rapid ventricular response in patients with ACS and AF associated with severe LV dysfunction and HF or hemodynamic instability. (Level of Evidence: C)
  • Administration of nondihydropyridine calcium antagonists might be considered to slow a rapid ventricular response in patients with ACS and AF only in the absence of significant HF or hemodynamic instability. (Level of Evidence: C)

Hyperthyroidism: Recommendations

Class I
  • Beta blockers are recommended to control ventricular rate in patients with AF complicating thyrotoxicosis unless contraindicated. (Level of Evidence: C)
  • In circumstances in which a beta blocker cannot be used, a nondihydropyridine calcium channel antagonist is recommended to control the ventricular rate. (Level of Evidence: C)

Pulmonary Disease: Recommendations

Class I
  • A nondihydropyridine calcium channel antagonist is recommended to control the ventricular rate in patients with AF and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. (Level of Evidence: C)
  • Direct-current cardioversion should be attempted in patients with pulmonary disease who become hemodynamically unstable as a consequence of new onset AF. (Level of Evidence: C)

Pulmonary Disease: Recommendations

Class I
  • A nondihydropyridine calcium channel antagonist is recommended to control the ventricular rate in patients with AF and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. (Level of Evidence: C)
  • Direct-current cardioversion should be attempted in patients with pulmonary disease who become hemodynamically unstable as a consequence of new onset AF. (Level of Evidence: C)

WPW and Pre-Excitation Syndromes: Recommendations

Class I
  • Prompt direct-current cardioversion is recommended for patients with AF, WPW, and rapid ventricular response who are hemodynamically compromised (64). (Level of Evidence: C)2. Intravenous procainamide or ibutilide to restore sinus rhythm or slow the ventricular rate is recommended for patients with pre-excited AF and rapid ventricular response who are not hemodynamically compromised (64). (Level of Evidence: C)
  • Catheter ablation of the accessory pathway is recommended in symptomatic patients with preexcited AF, especially if the accessory pathway has a short refractory period that allows rapid antegrade conduction (64). (Level of Evidence: C)
Class III: Harm
  • Administration of intravenous amiodarone, adenosine, digoxin (oral or intravenous), or nondihydropyridine calcium channel antagonists (oral or intravenous) in patients with WPW syndrome who have pre-excited AF is potentially harmful as they accelerate the ventricular rate. (Level of Evidence: B)

Heart Failure: Recommendations

Class I
  • Control of resting heart rate using either a beta blocker or a nondihydropyridine calcium channel antagonist is recommended for patients with persistent or permanent AF and compensated HF with preserved EF (HFpEF) (262). (Level of Evidence: B)
  • In the absence of pre-excitation, intravenous beta blocker administration (or a nondihydropyridine calcium channel antagonist in patients with HFpEF) is recommended to slow the ventricular response to AF in the acute setting, with caution needed in patients with overt congestion, hypotension, or HF with reduced LVEF (496-499). (Level of Evidence: B)
  • In the absence of pre-excitation, intravenous digoxin or amiodarone is recommended to control heart rate acutely in patients with HF (270, 497, 500, 501). (Level of Evidence: B)
  • Assessment of heart rate control during exercise and adjustment of pharmacological treatment to keep the rate in the physiological range is useful in symptomatic patients during activity. (Level of Evidence: C)
  • Digoxin is effective to control resting heart rate in patients with HF with reduced EF. (Level of Evidence: C)
Class IIa
  • A combination of digoxin and a beta blocker (or a nondihydropyridine calcium channel antagonist for patients with HFpEF), is reasonable to control resting and exercise heart rate in patients with AF (260, 497). (Level of Evidence: B)
  • It is reasonable to perform AV node ablation with ventricular pacing to control heart rate when pharmacological therapy is insufficient or not tolerated (262, 502, 503). (Level of Evidence: B)
  • Intravenous amiodarone can be useful to control the heart rate in patients with AF when other measures are unsuccessful or contraindicated. (Level of Evidence: C)
  • For patients with AF and rapid ventricular response causing or suspected of causing tachycardiainduced cardiomyopathy, it is reasonable to achieve rate control by either AV nodal blockade or a rhythm-control strategy (52, 300, 504). (Level of Evidence: B)
  • For patients with chronic HF who remain symptomatic from AF despite a rate-control strategy, it is reasonable to use a rhythm-control strategy. (Level of Evidence: C)
Class IIb
  • Oral amiodarone may be considered when resting and exercise heart rate cannot be adequately controlled using a beta blocker (or a nondihydropyridine calcium channel antagonist in patients with HFpEF) or digoxin, alone or in combination. (Level of Evidence: C)
  • AV node ablation may be considered when the rate cannot be controlled and tachycardiamediated cardiomyopathy is suspected. (Level of Evidence: C)
Class III: Harm
  • For rate control, intravenous nondihydropyridine calcium channel antagonists, intravenous beta blockers, and dronedarone should not be administered to patients with decompensated HF. (Level of Evidence: C)

 

Ora puoi seguire MEDEST anche su Facebook

MEDEST you tube

 

Towards cardiopulmonary resuscitation without vasoactive drugs

23 apr

Key points of sistematic analysis about ALS managent of Out of Hospital Cardiac Arrest (OHCA):

 

  1. No evidence that any of the commonly used vasoactive drugs are beneficial on neurological outcome
  2. Controversial evidences on antiarrhythmics drugs effectivness
  3. Only good quality CPR and electric therapy improves outcome
  4. Ultra Sonography for diagnosis of underliyng reversible causes and targeted therapies on individual patient’s response must be implemented
  5. EtCO2, Near-infrared spectometry, VF analysis, Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation must be part of future management

 

Untitled

And ROSC is not the finish line but only a step to it. More and more voices are rising toward the definition of an Early Goal Directed Post-Resuscitative Care!

References:

Towards cardiopulmonary resuscitation without vasoactive drugs

Image attribution:

Kjetil Sunde,Theresa M. Olasveengen

MEDEST you tube

MEDEST Review 24. Il meglio della letteratura internazionale.

23 apr

MEDEST-review

Ancora letteratura ancora articoli ancora novità in medicina d’urgenza.

 

Attenzione! MEDEST incoraggia la lettura completa e responsabile degli articoli proposti. Evitate sgradevoli effetti collaterali!
Scaricate il full text ed approfondite gli argomenti d’interesse con altre fonti per un’informazione consapevole e quanto più possibile completa dei temi trattati.

Questa settimana su MEDEST review:

Comparison of Dopamine and Norepinephrine in the Treatment of Shock

Vasopressori e gestione dello shock. Un argomento affascinante in cui ancora non è stato detto nulla di veramente conclusivo. In questo studio randomizzato e multicentrico vengono comparati due dei vasopressori maggiormente usati in emergenza. Dopamina vs Noradrenalina. Nessuna differenza sulla mortalità a lungo termine tra i due gruppi, ma maggiori eventi aritmici nel gruppo di pazienti trattati con Dopamina. L’analisi dei subgruppi ha inoltre dimostrato un aumento di mortalità nei pazienti con shock cardiogeno e trattati con Dopamina.

Effects of prehospital 12-lead ECG on processes of care and mortality in acute coronary syndrome

L’esecuzione di un ECG a 12 derivazioni fin dalla fase preospedaliera del soccorso è diventato uno “standrd of care” recepito anche dalle recenti linee guida internazionali. Di facile esecuzione ed a basso costo, ma anche con evidenti vantaggi sulla sopravvivenza dei pazienti STEMI e NSTEMI, come dimostrato da questo articolo.

Exploring which patients without return of spontaneous circulation following ventricular fibrillation out-of-hospital cardiac arrest should be transported to hospital

Gli autori hanno effettuato una rcerca retrospettiva sul VACAR, uno dei registri ACR più completi, al fine di identificare l’outcome dei pazienti trasportti in Dipartimento d’emergenza con RCP in corso. Ne deducono che l’outcome di questi pazienti è sfavorevole per una serie di motivi: bassa qualità della RCP in movimento e scarsa preparazione del ricevente. Auspicano che la RCP meccanica e l’esecuzioen dell’ELS in Dipartimento d’emergenza siano più che un progetto per poter migliorare l’outcome e dare nuove prospettive alla gestione avanzata dell’ACR.

Steroid-Pressor Cocktail for In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest? – See more at: http://www.jwatch.org/na31719/2013/09/24/steroid-pressor-cocktail-hospital-cardiac-arrest#sthash.qZBir4Aa.dpuf

Gli investigatori dimostrano che non vi è differenza in mortalità tra i pazienti traumatizzati intubati con laringoscopio tradizionale rispetto a quelli intubati con un videolaringoscopio. Ma l’impossibilità a randomizzare almeno il 30% dei pazienti per scelta dell’operatore, che ha preferito il videolaringoscopio per previsione di intubazione difficile, ha sicuramente influenzato positivamente la prestazione della laringoscopia diretta.

Predicting the lack of ROSC during pre-hospital CPR- Should an end-tidal CO 2 of 1.3 kPa be used as a cut-off value

La ricerca di indictori predittivi di outcome nei pazienti in ACR è determinante per indirizzare gli sforzi rianimatori. L’avvento della EtCO2 può dare un grande contributo in questo senso. I suoi valori ci guidano in varie fasi della rianimazione, ma il riscontro di valori inizialmente bassi (<1,3 KPascal), come dimostrato da questo studio, non può essere assunto come valore indicativo assoluto di cattivo outcome.

Therapeutic hypothermia in Italian Intensive Care Units after 2010 resuscitation guidelines- Still a lot to do

In questo articolo si fa il punto sull’utilizzo dell’ipotermia terapeutica nelle trarapie intensive in Italia. Gli autori hanno sottoposto un questionario sul tema a 847 terapie intensive di tutte le Regioni d’Italia. Delle 405 ritenute elegibili secondo i criteri dello studio il 55,1% di esse pratica ipotermia terapeutica e 44,1% no. Un’Italia divisa sul tema come del resto diviso è il mondo scientifico sull’utilità o meno dell’ipotermia dopo le recenti evidenze.

 

Puoi trovare la raccolta di tutti gli articoli citati nelle review di MEDEST a questo link

Logo MEDEST2
Seguici su Google+

Clicca su MEDEST e scopri chi siamo

Mind of Resuscitation in Traumatic Cardiac Arrest

19 apr
TCA blunt

BLUNT TRAUMATIC CARDIAC ARREST

MEDEST
TCA pen

PENETRATING TRAUMATIC CARDIAC ARREST

MEDEST

ST↑ in aVR: un’alterazione di tutto rispetto

16 apr

homer_the_scream

Qualche mese fa MEDEST ha pubblicato un post in merito ad un caso clinico in cui un ECG con alterazione del tratto ST in aVR era stato trascurato per un atteggiamento di diffusa sufficienza con cui molti clinici guardano alle alterazioni presenti in questa derivazione.

Approfittiamo di questo ECG, registrato ieri a domicilio in un paziente di con dolore toracico, per puntualizzare alcuni concetti fondamentali riguardo alle alterazioni del tratto ST in aVR:

STE aVR_c

Click to enlarge/Clicca per ingrandire

  • L’elevazione del tratto in ST↑ ≥1 mm in aVR, nel contesto di diffuse alterazioni ischemiche (ST↓), è un segno ischemico molto grave, patognomonico per occlusione del tronco comune (LMCA), della discendente anteriore (LAD) o di malattia dei tre vasi (3VD)
  • I pazienti con ST↑ ≥1 mm in aVR e clinica tipica devono essere sottoposti PTCA in urgenza
  • L’assenza di ST↑ in aVR esclude con molta accuratezza la probabilità di occlusione del tronco comune
  • I criteri sopra esposti non sono applicabili in caso di TPSV o in assenza di segni clinici di ischemia
  • ST ↑ in aVR+ST↑ in aVL indicano occlusione del tronco comune (LMCA)
  • ST ↑ in aVR+ST↑ in V1 indicano occlusione del tronco comune (LMCA) o della discendente anteriore (LAD)
    • ST ↑ in aVR >ST↑ in V1 fa sospettare l’occlusione del tronco comune (LMCA) piuttosto che quello della discendente anteriore (LAD)
  • ST↑ in aVR ≥ 1mm è associato con un aumento fino a 6 volte della mortalità
  • ST↑ in aVR ≥ 1.5mm è associato ad una mortalità che può andare dal 25% al 70%

In conclusione aVR merita più considerazione, perchè il rilievo di ST↑ in questa derivazione indica lesioni a carico di vasi motlo critici per la circolazione coronarica e la prognosi di questi pazienti è altamente sfavorevole.

MEDEST you tube

 

 

 

References:

  1. aVR the forgotten lead
  2. ST Elevation in aVR – LMCA occlusion?
  3. aVR The Neglected Lead
  4. Williamson K, Mattu A, Plautz CU, et al. Electrocardiographic applications of lead aVR. Am J Emerg Med. 2006 Nov;24(7):864-74
  5. Rokos IC, French WJ, Mattu A, et al. Appropriate cardiac cath lab activation: optimizing the electrocardiogram interpretation and clinical decision making for acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction. Am Heart J. 2010 Dec; 160(6):995-1003
  6. Nikus KC, Eskola MJ. Electrocardiogram patterns in acute left main coronary artery occlusion. J Electrocardiology. 2008 Nov-Dec;41(6):626-9
  7. Kosuge M, Ebina T, Hibi K, et at. An early and simple predictor of severe left main and/or three-vessel disease in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome. Am J Cardiol. 2011 Feb 15;107(4):495-500
  8. Nikus K, Pahlm O, Wagner G, et al. Electrocardiographic classification of acute coronary syndromes: a review by a committee of the International Society for Holter and Non-Invasive Electrocardiology. 2010 Mar-Apr;43(2):93, 97-98
 

 

Time is brain?

13 apr

On Stroke (an AHA journal) has recently been published a study entitled Stroke Thrombolysis- Save a Minute, Save a Day” in wich the authors concluded that “time is brain”

This is an observational prospective study conducted between 1998 and 2011 on a cohrt of 2258 consecutive stroke patients treated with r-TPA.

The results shown how any minute delay on TPA administration is a day less in the patient’s life.

But I’m skeptical, and to support my skpepticism, here is a post of the king of skeptical blog in emergency medicine: The Skeptical guide to Emergency Medicine:  Thrombolysis for Acute Stroke in wich in wich are well summarized all the trials on TPA in stroke and many other great resources.

This is the wonderful presentation  by Ken MilneTPA-in-CVA-pdf on the argument.

MEDEST you tubeSo are you really sure that the actual evidences at the base of TPA administration for the stroke patients are so evident?

 

 

MEDEST Review 23. Il meglio della letteratura internazionale.

12 apr

MEDEST-review

Ancora letteratura ancora articoli ancora novità in medicina d’urgenza.

 

Attenzione! MEDEST incoraggia la lettura completa e responsabile degli articoli proposti. Evitate sgradevoli effetti collaterali!
Scaricate il full text ed approfondite gli argomenti d’interesse con altre fonti per un’informazione consapevole e quanto più possibile completa dei temi trattati.

Questa settimana su MEDEST review:

Cardiac arrest from accidental hypothermia, a rare condition with potentially excellent neurological outcome, if you treat it right

L’ACR da ipotermia è una condizione drammatica ma potenzialmente a prognosi più favorevole rispetto alle altre cause di ACR. La consapevolezza dello scenario, la RCP di buona qualità e la centralizzazione verso ospedali che permettono l’extracorporeal rewarming, permette a questi pazienti di avere maggiori chance di recupero neurologico. In questo articolo si auspica che la creazione di linee guida condivise faccia fare passi importanti al trattamento di questa condizione.

Stroke Thrombolysis- Save a Minute, Save a Day

L’uso del trombolitico nello stroke ischemico e l’assioma “time is brain” trova in questo recente articolo un supporto di evidenza, seppure di basso livello (osservazionale e prospettico). Gli autori affermano che ogni minuto di ritardo nella somministrazione del trombolitico porta ad un’aspettativa di vita inferiore di 1 giorno. Permetteteci di essere scettici e a tal proposito leggete un recente post apparso su The Skeptical Guide to Emergency Medicine per avere un quadro più chiaro e complessivo degli studi sulla terapia trombolitica nello stroke.

Survival of resuscitated cardiac arrest patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) conveyed directly to a Heart Attack Centre by ambulance clinicians

In questo studio retrospettivo si ribadisce come una centralizzazione dei pazienti rianimati verso un centro “PCI capable” migliora la sopravvivenza. Uno spunto organizzativo illuminante per ribadire che la coronarografia deve essere parte integrante del percorso post-rianimazione di ogni paziente post-ACR.

Steroid-Pressor Cocktail for In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest? – See more at: http://www.jwatch.org/na31719/2013/09/24/steroid-pressor-cocktail-hospital-cardiac-arrest#sthash.qZBir4Aa.dpuf

Gli investigatori dimostrano che non vi è differenza in mortalità tra i pazienti traumatizzati intubati con laringoscopio tradizionale rispetto a quelli intubati con un videolaringoscopio. Ma l’impossibilità a randomizzare almeno il 30% dei pazienti per scelta dell’operatore, che ha preferito il videolaringoscopio per previsione di intubazione difficile, ha sicuramente influenzato positivamente la prestazione della laringoscopia diretta.

Unfractionated Heparin vs Bivalirudin in Primary PCI- The HEAT – PPCI Trial

Bivalirudin Bleeding? More Questions- NAPLES III, BRAVE 4, and BRIGHT

Ancora risultati deludenti per il pretrattamento con i nuovi anticoagulanti nello STEMI che fa la PCI. Maggiori eventi cardiaci e nessun vantaggio sulla percentuale di sanguinamento. L’eparina non frazionata rimane ancora, visto il rapporto prezzo-beneficio, una scelta attuale.

Undetectable High Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin T Level in the Emergency Department and Risk of Myocardial Infarction

L’uso dei biomarkers per lo screening dei paienti a rischio di IMA è uno standard alla ricerca di molecole sempre più performanti in termini di sensitivitò e specificità. La high sensitive Cardiac Troponin T (hs-cTnT) secondo questo studio potrebbe avere caratteristiche molto prossime al markers ideale, con un valore predittivo negativo a 30 giorni rispetivamente del 99,8% per gli eventi coronarici e del 100% per la morte di pazienti con dolore toracico ed ECG negativo.

 

Puoi trovare la raccolta di tutti gli articoli citati nelle review di MEDEST a questo link

Logo MEDEST2
Seguici su Google+

Clicca su MEDEST e scopri chi siamo

Resuscitation highlights 2013. Il presente ma anche molto del futuro della rianimazione cardiopolmonare.

6 apr
In questi due articoli pubblicati su Resuscitation si riassumono le novità più importanti per quello che riguarda la rianimazione cardiopolmonare sia di base che avanzata.
In attesa delle nuove linee guida, si mette un punto fermo sulle novità fin qui comparse dall’avvento delle linee guida 2010 e si gettano le basi fondamentali per quelle che saranno pubblicate nel 2015.
Una lettura fondamentale per tutti i professionisti dell’emergenza in cui vengono elencati molti degli studi che influenzeranno le scelte delle nuove linee guida, ma anche dei concetti fondmentali che ci devono guidare nella pratica quotidiana attuale.

Resuscitation highlights in 2013- Part 1 (full tex pdf)

Resuscitation highlights in 2013- Part 2 (full text pdf)

Scopri tutte le Linee Guida più recenti su MEDEST

 

MEDEST you tube

MEDEST Review 22. Il meglio della letteratura internazionale.

5 apr

MEDEST-review

Ancora letteratura ancora articoli ancora novità in medicina d’urgenza.

 

Attenzione! MEDEST incoraggia la lettura completa e responsabile degli articoli proposti. Evitate sgradevoli effetti collaterali!
Scaricate il full text ed approfondite gli argomenti d’interesse con altre fonti per un’informazione consapevole e quanto più possibile completa dei temi trattati.

Questa settimana su MEDEST review:

A Feasibility Study of Cerebral Oximetry During In-Hospital Mechanical and Manual Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

Noninvasive regional cerebral oxygen saturation for neurological prognostication of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest- A prospective multicenter observational study.pdf

Cerebral Oximetry During Cardiac Arrest. Feasible, But Benefit Yet to Be Determined

Siete incuriositi, interessati o è semplicemente la prima volta che sentite parlare di misurazione non invasiva dell’ossimetria cerebrale? In questi due articoli trovate due buoni motivi per approfondire: è fattibile ed è utile alla prognosi sull’outcome neurologico dei pazienti colpiti da ACR. Una metodica ancora agli albori della sua vita, ma chissà che non ne sentiremo parlare in futuro, magari con qualche maggiore informazione sui suoi reali benefici.

Liberal Versus Restricted Fluid Resuscitation Strategies in Trauma Patients

Fluid Resuscitation- Less Is More

La rianimazione volemica e la oramai consolidata pratica dell’ipotensione permissiva: quali evidenze sono disponibili in merito? Nonostante le molte limitazioni che gli studi disponibili presentano, la somministrazione controllata di fluidi è oramai uno “standard of care” nel trauma. L’ articolo evidenzia proprio attraverso una review sistematica la superiorità  di questa pratica ma anche le limitazioni menzionate.

Adrenaline for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest resuscitation- A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

Un classico argomento ed una classica conclusione della review: nessun beneficio sull’outcome neurologico dalla somministrazione di Adrenalina durante ACR.

Steroid-Pressor Cocktail for In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest? – See more at: http://www.jwatch.org/na31719/2013/09/24/steroid-pressor-cocktail-hospital-cardiac-arrest#sthash.qZBir4Aa.dpuf

Gli investigatori dimostrano che non vi è differenza in mortalità tra i pazienti traumatizzati intubati con laringoscopio tradizionale rispetto a quelli intubati con un videolaringoscopio. Ma l’impossibilità a randomizzare almeno il 30% dei pazienti per scelta dell’operatore, che ha preferito il videolaringoscopio per previsione di intubazione difficile, ha sicuramente influenzato positivamente la prestazione della laringoscopia diretta.

An update on out-of-hospital airway management practices in the United States

Dall’analisi di un potente database (NEMSIS) che raccoglie dati da molti EMS negli Stati Uniti, si evidenziano basse percentuali di IOT e di successo dei metodi alternativi per la gestione delle vie aeree. Gli autori concludono che tutti gli sforzi devono essere diretti ad un migliormanto in questo campo cruciale della medicina d’urgenza preospedaliera.

The Process of Prehospital Airway Management- Challenges and Solutions During Paramedic Endotracheal Intubation

Ed ancora di gestione delle vie aeree si occupa questa interessante analisi. Propone interessanti chiavi di lettura a molti dei problemi incontrati dai professionisti preospedalieri e propone soluzioni che meritano di essere tenute in considerazione.

Manual vs. integrated automatic load-distributing band CPR with equal survival after out of hospital cardiac arrest. The randomized CIRC trial

E dopo lo studio Mechanical Chest Compressions and Simultaneous Defibrillation vs Conventional Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in cui veniva dimostrato come il device meccanico (in quel caso il LUCAS 2) non avesse benefici sull’outcome neurologico del paziente post-ACR, ecco che ora, con tempistiche assolutamente politically correct, viene pubblicato uno studio analgo su un altro device meccanico per le compressioni toraciche. Device differente stesse conclusioni. Ancora nessuna evidenza di beneficio usando un massaggiatore meccanico rispetto ad una RCP di buona qualità.

 

Puoi trovare la raccolta di tutti gli articoli citati nelle review di MEDEST a questo link

Logo MEDEST2
Seguici su Google+

Clicca su MEDEST e scopri chi siamo

The Death of the Cervical Collar?

3 apr

Originally posted on AmboFOAM:

Those fantastic Vikings over at one of my favourite FOAMed sites, ScanCrit have been rampaging through the dogma of cervical collars for some time, and now it seems the campaign is coming to a head:

Bergen EMS will no longer apply c-collars to patients

View original 299 altre parole

Passion for Italy

Discovering Italian Food, Wine and its Regions

GoogleFOAM

The FOAM Search Engine

EM Lyceum

where everything is up for debate . . .

Doctor's bag

by Dr Edwin Kruys

Pediatric EM Morsels

Pediatric Emergency Medicine Education

EM Pills

curiosità-novità-aggiornamenti in medicina d'urgenza

AmboFOAM

Free Open Access Medical Education for Paramedics

FOAM4GP

Free Open Access Meducation 4 General Practice

Sim and Choppers

A blog combining medical education, simulation and helicopter retrieval medicine

Rural Doctors Net

useful resources for rural clinicians

Auckland HEMS

Unofficial site for prehospital care providers of the Auckland HEMS service

ECHOARTE

L'ECOGRAFIA: ENTROPIA DELL'IMMAGINE

MEDEST

medicina d'urgenza preospedaliera

ruralflyingdoc

Just another WordPress.com site

EM Basic

Your Boot Camp Guide to Emergency Medicine

KI Doc

WE HAVE MOVED - VISIT WWW.KIDOCS.ORG FOR NEW CONTENT

OSU Emergency Medicine

Blog on Emergency Medicine at Ohio State

ERCAST Emergency Medicine Podcasts

Emergency medicine, podcasts, reviews, opinion and curbside consults

medicina d'urgenza preospedaliera

medicina d'urgenza preospedaliera

medicina d'urgenza preospedaliera

Greater Sydney Area HEMS

The Pre-hospital & Retrieval Medicine Team of Ambulance Service NSW

PHARM

Prehospital and retrieval medicine blog

Life in the Fast Lane

Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog

Iscriviti

Ricevi al tuo indirizzo email tutti i nuovi post del sito.

Unisciti agli altri 431 follower

%d blogger cliccano Mi Piace per questo: